Learning at Home | Week of 2/22 – 2/26

Take advantage of this week’s Learning at Home broadcast schedule – great for students engaged in hybrid or distance instruction, and families looking to spend some extra, quality time together!

After watching these fascinating programs, explore the PBS LearningMedia and web resources to learn more.

Highlight of the Week

George Washington Carver: An Uncommon Life
Thursday, February 25, 1 PM

While George Washington Carver’s rise from slavery to scientific accomplishment has inspired millions, time has reduced him to the man who did something with peanuts. This documentary uncovers Carver’s complexities and reveals the full impact of his life and work.

Learning at Home
Week of 2/22 – 2/26

Monday, February 22

12 PM: Let’s Learn – What Letters Do You See in Heart?

“Let’s Learn” helps children ages 3-8 with at-home learning. Make ice cream, read “I Really Want to See You, Grandma!”, listen for sounds in words.

1 PM: NATURE: Equus “Story of the Horse” ⎪ Origins

The relationship between man and his noble steed is almost as old as civilization itself, allowing our species to explore, conquer and flourish side by side with the horse. NATURE traces this revolutionizing partnership with anthropologist Niobe Thompson in this two-part series. In “Origins,” explore the fascinating evolutionary journey of the horse, from its tiny forest-dwelling ancestor called the Dawn Horse to the modern steed. Encounter scientists unlocking the genetic basis of horsepower and decoding their emotional intelligence.

2 PM: Equus “Story of the Horse” ⎪ Chasing the Wind

Discover how humans have partnered with the horse throughout the centuries, creating more than 350 breeds found all around the world.


Tuesday, February 23

12 PM: Let’s Learn – What Letter Does Create Start With?

“Let’s Learn” helps children ages 3-8 with at-home learning. Meet an emperor scorpion, learn about neighborhood helpers, read “A Fort on the Moon,” blend and decode words.

1 PM: NOVA: Beyond the Elements: Life

Without the chemistry of photosynthesis, ozone, and a molecule called Rubisco, none of us would be here. So how did we get so lucky? To find out, host David Pogue investigates the surprising molecules that allowed life on Earth to begin, and ultimately thrive. Along the way, he finds out what we’re all made of—literally. 

2 PM: H20: The Molecule That Made Us ⎪ Crisis

Crisis examines how the planet’s changing water cycle is forcing us to change our relationship with water. An increasingly, globalized agricultural industry is turning precious water reserves into profit, “mining” water faster than it can be replaced. As Chairman Emeritus of Nestle, Peter Brabeck-Letmathe says, “…. the water issue is more urgent than the climate issue.”


Wednesday, February 24

12 PM: Let’s Learn – Count Rhymes with Amount!

“Let’s Learn” helps children ages 3-8 with at-home learning. Thank community helpers, learn to measure, rhyme, read “If You Plant a Seed.”

1 PM: Muhammad: Legacy of a Prophet

Muhammad: Legacy of a Prophet tells the story of a man who changed the world 1,400 years ago and now lives in the United States through the lives of the millions of Americans who practice Islam and regard him as God’s prophet. It travels in the footsteps of the founder of Islam’s Prophet Muhammad to the Arabian Desert and the holy city of Mecca where Muhammad’s story unfolded. But the film does not just stay in the past.


Thursday, February 25

12 PM: Let’s Learn – Day and Dog Start with D!

“Let’s Learn” helps children ages 3-8 with at-home learning. Be a beat boss, tell time, make a balloon blow itself up, read “Our Favorite Day.”

1 PM: George Washington Carver: An Uncommon Life

While George Washington Carver’s rise from slavery to scientific accomplishment has inspired millions, time has reduced him to the man who did something with peanuts. This documentary uncovers Carver’s complexities and reveals the full impact of his life and work.

2 PM: Talking Black in America

Talking Black in America follows the unique circumstances of the descendants of American slaves and their incredible impact on American life and language. Speech varieties from the African American community reflect the imprint of African language systems, the influences of regional British and Southern American dialects, and the creativity and resilience of people living through oppression, segregation and the fight for equality. Filmed across the United States, Talking Black in America is a startling revelation of language as legacy, identity and triumph over adversity.


Friday, February 26

12 PM: Let’s Learn – What Letters Do You See in Find?

“Let’s Learn” helps children ages 3-8 with at-home learning. Think like a computer, make a cloud dance, read “Nerdy Babies: Ocean,” blend and decode short i, r, f, & final s.

1 PM: Articulate | It Takes Two, Krimes and Punishment, Stephen Costello’s Most Valuable Friend

Tango is a complex improvised form that’s danced the world over. Jesse Krimes describes his six years in federal prison as a kind of “artist residency.” Celebrated opera tenor Stephen Costello has been both blessed and betrayed by his voice.

1:30 PM: Poetry in America: Shirt

What is a cherished garment made of? What is a poem made of? Labor and raw materials, tradition and innovation, influences both local and global and–art–are stitched into both. At New York Fashion Week, host Elisa New catches up with fashion designer Johnson Hartig, Bergdorf Goodman’s Betty Halbreich, shoe designer Stuart Weitzman, and design and poetry students from the New School to discuss Robert Pinsky’s “Shirt.” Back in Boston, poet Robert Pinsky helps trace the intricate history of the garment and the poem.

2 PM: Kindred Spirits: Artists Hilda Wilkinson Brown and Lilian Thomas Burwell

Kindred Spirits explores the unique relationship between an African American aunt and niece who became accomplished artists and educators despite the hardships of the Great Depression and the inequities of racial segregation. The story of their lives, their works of art and sources of inspiration are presented against the backdrop of a segregated society.

2:30 PM: Spotlight Special: Fulton Fryar’s Closet

Spotlight Special: Fulton Fryar’s Closet tells a relatively unknown story of racial inequality in 1950’s Adirondack culture, and how memories of it resurfaced recently when a building at Seagle Music Colony faced demolition. The building housed a young singer named Fulton Fryar, the first African American singer to study at the colony, and whose sleeping quarters in 1957 were kept separate from those of the other singers on the campus. Learn what role architectural experts, museum curators and concerned citizens are playing to make sure Fryar’s story will be remembered.

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Learning At Home Schedule – April 2021