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Learning at Home | Week of 2/15 – 2/19

Take advantage of this week’s Learning at Home broadcast schedule – great for students engaged in hybrid or distance instruction, and families looking to spend some extra, quality time together!

After watching these fascinating programs, explore the PBS LearningMedia and web resources to learn more.

Highlight of the Week

Articulate: The Cutting Edge of Stained Glass, Bodies of Work, Eric Owens
Friday, February 19, 1 PM

For more than thirty years, Judith Schaechter has been applying avant-garde sensibilities to a once traditional art form; stained glass. In the past century or so, tattoos have gone from being a mark of the outsider to a more socially accepted expression of self. With a voice and stage presence as big as his personality, Eric Owens is among the most celebrated bass-baritones in the opera world.

Learning at Home
Week of 2/15 – 2/19

Monday, February 15

12 PM: Let’s Learn – ST and OP make STOP!

Let’s Learn helps children ages 3-8 with at-home learning. Play a shopping game, move to the rhythm of your name, blend sounds to make words, make a mandala in nature, read “Zero Local: Next Stop Kindness.”

1 PM: NATURE: Big Bend

Roam the Wild West frontier land of the Rio Grande’s Big Bend alongside its iconic animals, including black bears, rattlesnakes and scorpions.

2 PM: Europe’s New Wild – Return of the Titans

In the Carpathian mountains and other wildlife strongholds, nature is being given a helping hand. The reintroduction of European bison and the spread of the gray wolf across the continent signal a wildlife comeback which is benefiting not only other animals but humans as well.


Tuesday, February 16

12 PM: Let’s Learn – Bread and Balloon Start with “b”!

Let’s Learn helps children ages 3-8 with at-home learning. Make playdough, learn math by sorting, read “Fry Bread,” segment sounds in words, learn to trace and breathe.

1 PM: NOVA: Beyond the Elements: Indestructible

Glass so strong you can jump on it, rubber so tough it protects a clay pot dropped from 50 feet, endless varieties of plastic. Scientists and engineers have created virtually indestructible versions of common materials by manipulating the chains of interlocking atoms that give them strength—but have they made them too tough? Host David Pogue explores the fantastic chemistry behind the everyday materials we depend on, and how the quest for durability can be balanced with products’ environmental impact.

2 PM: H20: The Molecule That Made Us ⎪ Civilizations

‘Civilizations’ turns our ‘water lens’ on human history. Starting in Ancient Egypt, it charts the critical role water plays in history, and around the world we see the birth of civilizations on the banks of the great rivers: Nile, Tigris and Euphrates, Indus and Yellow. We end by asking if we can guarantee water supplies of the future?


Wednesday, February 17

12 PM: Let’s Learn – ST and EP Make STEP!

Let’s Learn helps children ages 3-8 with at-home learning. Race to the top floor, play “Simon Says” to blend sounds, learn about our community, read “After the Fall: How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again.”

1 PM: American Masters | Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise

Distinctly referred to as “a redwood tree, with deep roots in American culture,” Dr. Maya Angelou (April 4, 1928-May 28, 2014) led a prolific life. As a singer, dancer, activist, poet and writer, she inspired generations with lyrical modern African-American thought that pushed boundaries. Best known for her autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (Random House), she gave people the freedom to think about their history in a way they never had before.


Thursday, February 18

12 PM: Let’s Learn – Can You Find the Short “a” in Fast?

Let’s Learn helps children ages 3-8 with at-home learning. Create a bubble wand and number stories, blend and decode words, read “Fast and Slow.”

1 PM: American Experience: Voice of Freedom

On Easter Sunday, 1939, contralto Marian Anderson stepped up to a microphone in front of the Lincoln Memorial. Inscribed on the walls of the monument behind her were the words “all men are created equal.” Barred from performing in Constitution Hall because of her race, Anderson would sing for the American people in the open air. Hailed as a voice that “comes around once in a hundred years” by maestros in Europe and widely celebrated by both white and black audiences at home, her fame hadn’t been enough to spare her from the indignities and outright violence of racism and segregation. Voice of Freedom interweaves Anderson’s rich life story with this landmark moment in history, exploring fundamental questions about talent, race, fame, democracy, and the American soul.


Friday, February 19

12 PM: Let’s Learn – Cape Rhymes with Shape!

Let’s Learn helps children ages 3-8 with at-home learning. Be a plant champion, play in the shadows, do a shape dance, read “Vroom,” learn about computers, practice rhyming.

1 PM: Articulate | The Cutting Edge of Stained Glass, Bodies of Work, Eric Owens

For more than thirty years, Judith Schaechter has been applying avant-garde sensibilities to a once traditional art form; stained glass. In the past century or so, tattoos have gone from being a mark of the outsider to a more socially accepted expression of self. With a voice and stage presence as big as his personality, Eric Owens is among the most celebrated bass-baritones in the opera world.

1:30 PM: Poetry in America: Musée des Beaux Arts

With Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, with journalist and ethicist David Brooks, and with poet, professor, and painter Peter Sacks, ponder W.H. Auden’s World War II era reflections on suffering in “Musée des Beaux Arts.”  How are ordinary people to regard, and respond to, suffering they have not caused? Who can help us find the way? The statesman, the journalist, the poet, the painter?

2 PM: The Art of Home: A Wind River Story

The Art of Home: A Wind River Story tells the stories of two indigenous artists who create new works reflecting on their tribal homelands, the Wind River Indian Reservation. Ken Williams (Arapaho) is a Santa Fe art celebrity, and Sarah Ortegon (Shoshone) is an up-and-coming actress in Denver. Both artists travel to Wind River Reservation to reconnect with their ancestors and present their art work to a somewhat isolated community.

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