Take advantage of this week’s Learning at Home broadcast schedule – great for students engaged in hybrid or distance instruction, and families looking to spend some extra, quality time together!

After watching these fascinating programs, explore the PBS LearningMedia and web resources to learn more.

Highlight of the Week

American Masters | Unladylike2020: The Changemakers
Monday, November 2, 2 PM

Illuminating the stories of extraordinary American heroines from the early years of feminism, American Masters — Unladylike2020 is a multimedia series consisting of a one-hour special for broadcast (Unladylike2020: The Changemakers) and 26 digital short films featuring courageous, little-known and diverse female trailblazers from the turn of the 20th century.

Learning at Home
Week of 11/02 – 11/06

Monday, November 2

1 PM: Not Done: Women Remaking America

Chart the last five years of the women’s movement and its re-energized, intersectional fight for equality. Activists, journalists, entertainers, athletes and politicians report from the frontlines of the feminist tidal wave.

2 PM: American Masters | Unladylike2020: The Changemakers

Illuminating the stories of extraordinary American heroines from the early years of feminism, American Masters —Unladylike2020 is a multimedia series consisting of a one-hour special for broadcast (Unladylike2020: The Changemakers) and 26 digital short films featuring courageous, little-known and diverse female trailblazers from the turn of the 20th century.


Tuesday, November 3

1 PM: By One Vote: Women Suffrage in the South

In August 1920 in Nashville, Tennessee legislators cast the deciding vote to ratify the 19th Amendment, thus giving women in the United States the right to vote. Narrated by Rosanne Cash, By One Vote: Woman Suffrage in the South chronicles events leading up to that turbulent, nail-biting showdown.

2 PM: Raising Ms. President

In the documentary Raising Ms. President, filmmaker Kiley Lane Parker explores why more women don’t run for office. Through interviews with elected officials, scholars, high school students and leaders of two non-profits dedicated to raising the next generation of female leaders, the program investigates where political ambition begins and why society should encourage more women to lead. 


Wednesday, November 4

1 PM: NOVA: Can We Cool the Planet?

As global temperatures continue to rise, scientists are wondering if we need solutions beyond reducing emissions. Enter geoengineering. From sucking carbon straight out of the air to physically blocking out sunlight, the options may seem far-fetched. But as time runs out on conventional solutions to climate change, scientists are asking the hard questions: Can geoengineering really work?

2 PM: The Age of Nature | Changing

Discover why restoring nature might be our best tool to slow global warming. From Borneo to Antarctica, the resilience of the planet is helping us find solutions to cope and even mitigate climate change, providing hope for a more positive future.


Thursday, November 5

1 PM: The Final Invasion: Battle of Plattsburgh

The Final Invasion reveals the amazing struggle of America’s “Forgotten War” with Great Britain in 1812. The film offers a general overview on the causes of the War of 1812 and then concentrates on a key battle that changed the course of American history in 1814. Shot on-location in Great Britain, Canada and the US The Final Invasion features leading authors, re-enactments, previously unpublished diaries and newly discovered documents.

2 PM: Anthem

Anthem tells the story behind Francis Scott Key’s creation of “The Star-Spangled Banner” and explores the role of music and patriotism during The War of 1812. Learn about the songs and events that influenced Key to write what would become the national anthem of the United States.


Friday, November 6

1 PM: The Hudson River School: Artistic Pioneers

In the vicinity of New York’s Hudson River Valley, a group of American painters led by British born artist Thomas Cole forged an artistic vision of the wilderness. This was the first American school of landscape painting. Men with the names of Cole, Durand, Cropsey, Bierstadt, and Church would impress the world with their creative brilliance and wondrous vision. On canvas they would bring to life 19th century America.

2 PM: The Hudson River School: Cultivating a Tradition

In 19th century, artist Thomas Cole and engraver Asher Durand established an artistic movement that became The Hudson River School. The next generation expanded their palette with a technique that was immersed in light. This artistic innovation was later hailed as, “The Luminist Movement.” This film tells the story of these artists who became the greatest landscape painters in the world.